Archive for October 13th, 2009

Glenn Beck: Obama White House Thinks Fox ‘Enemy’

Posted on October 13, 2009. Filed under: Beck | Tags: , , , |

Glenn Beck mocked the White House’s new anti-Fox News press strategy Monday, declaring that the Obama administration now believe the fight against Fox is more important than the war in Afghanistan.

Beck then displayed a map of Manhattan and circled Fox’s headquarters, sarcastically calling Fox “the enemy” as he surrounded the spot on the map with toy tanks and barbed wire. Later, he suggested that the White House was using “your tax dollars to target the media.”

Beck was responding to Anita Dunn, the White House communications director, who told The New York Times on Sunday that the Obama administration is treating Fox News “the way we would treat an opponent.”

Dunn said that administration officials would still talk to Fox, and that President Obama was likely to be interviewed on the network in the future.

But Fox reported Monday that the channel has been told by the White House not to expect an interview with the president this year.

Here’s what Beck had to say: at NewsMax.com

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Sharpton, Jackson Attack Limbaugh’s Rams Bid

Posted on October 13, 2009. Filed under: Rush | Tags: , , , , , , , |

 ST. LOUIS —  The Revs. Al Sharpton and Jesse Jackson attacked the bid by Rush Limbaugh to buy the St. Louis Rams on Monday, saying the conservative radio host’s track record on race should exclude him from owning an NFL team.

Sharpton sent a letter to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, arguing that Limbaugh has been divisive and “anti-NFL” in some of his comments.

Jackson said in a telephone interview that Limbaugh had made his wealth “appealing to the fears of whites” with an unending line of insults against blacks and other minorities.

“The National Football League has set high standards for racial justice and inclusion,” Jackson said. “He should not have the privilege of owning an NFL franchise — and it is a privilege.” The civil rights leader said he’s had contact with numerous players and ex-players concerned about the bid.

For complete sports coverage, visit FOXSports.com

Limbaugh shot back at Sharpton on his radio show.

“Now, this saddens me as well this disappoints me,” he said. “I know Rev. Sharpton. Sharpton is better than this. He knows better than this. You know, I didn’t judge Al Sharpton’s fitness to be in radio when he wanted to earn an honest living for once, given his well-documented past as the author of the Tawana Brawley hoax. I believe in freedom and I also don’t discriminate.”

Limbaugh said last week that he is teaming up with St. Louis Blues hockey team owner Dave Checketts in a bid to buy the Rams. He has declined to discuss details of the offer, citing a confidentiality agreement.

In 2003, Limbaugh worked briefly on ESPN’s NFL pregame show. He resigned after saying Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Donovan McNabb was overrated because the media wanted to see a black quarterback succeed.

Transcripts posted on the radio host’s Web site also say that on a January 2007 show, Limbaugh commented: “The NFL all too often looks like a game between the Bloods and the Crips without any weapons. There, I said it.”

Asked about Limbaugh’s bid to purchase the winless Rams, McNabb said: “If he’s rewarded to buy them, congratulations to him. But I won’t be in St. Louis any time soon.”

NFL spokesman Greg Aiello said the league is aware of the concerns voiced by Sharpton and Jackson.

“It is very early in the process and no transfer of ownership of the Rams has been presented to the league for review,” Aiello said.

The latest complaints came a day after executive director of the NFL Players Association, DeMaurice Smith, urged players to speak out against Limbaugh’s bid.

“I have asked our players to embrace their roles not only in the game of football but also as players and partners in the business of the NFL,” Smith said in a statement Sunday. “They risk everything to play this game, they understand that risk and they live with that risk and its consequences for the rest of their life.

“We also know that there is an ugly part of history and we will not risk going backwards, giving up giving in or lying down to it.”

Players on the 0-5 Rams, who were routed by the Minnesota Vikings 38-10 on Sunday, tried to distance themselves from the controversy.

“I’m paying attention, but I’m not even touching that one,” running back Steven Jackson said. “Because if I start touching it I might go somewhere I don’t want to go.”

Defensive end Chris Long said he just heard Monday that Limbaugh was part of a group seeking to purchase the team. His reaction: “Oh, is that the guy on the radio?”

Reminded of Limbaugh’s statements about McNabb, Long seemed to disapprove while adding he didn’t care who owned the team.

“I mean, those weren’t great comments at all,” Long said. “But it’s not my job to really comment on that.”

Defensive end Leonard Little, the last remaining player from the Rams’ Super Bowl championship after the 1999 season, didn’t want to talk about it.

“We’ve got a lot more things to worry about than who’s going to be our owner,” he said.

More on FoxNews.com

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The Mundell-Laffer Solution

Posted on October 13, 2009. Filed under: economy | Tags: , , , , , , , , |

By Lawrence Kudlow

Team Obama is in economic trouble on two fronts right now: The dollar could be headed toward its demise, while the jobs and unemployment numbers have gotten worse. (The unemployment rate is up to 9.8 percent as of the September report released last week.) And there’s a simple policy mix the White House could adopt to fix this. It could enact the Mundell-Laffer supply-side approach of a steady King Dollar for price stability and low marginal tax rates to spur jobs and economic growth.

Columbia professor and Nobel Prize winner Robert Mundell and Reagan advisor Arthur Laffer put this formula to work nearly 30 years ago, and it launched a massive low-inflation, bull-market prosperity. Of course, I am a supply-side fossil. I am a dinosaur and a relic of the past. But I still believe this approach could work again, even if it’s not going to happen.

The dollar has been falling on and off for nearly 10 years, and it’s in big trouble right now. The commodity inflation, housing bubble and oil shock of recent years all can be traced to dollar weakness and excess money-creation by the Fed. A weak dollar helped destroy the Bush Boom and create the Great Recession. But now people are talking about ending the dollar’s reserve-currency status.

According to London’s Independent, the Arab oil producers in the Gulf are planning with China, Russia, Japan and France to end dollar transactions for oil and move instead to a basket of currencies that might include the Japanese yen, the Chinese yuan and the euro, along with gold and some kind of regional Gulf-state currency.

I say, where there’s smoke there’s fire. The dollar-demise story just won’t go away, and it’s clear now that China and others have lost confidence in the greenback. For the U.S., this is mostly a self-inflicted wound. And the Treasury and the Fed are in denial about it. The gold price has jumped all the way to $1,050, while the dollar index has fallen again. Without question, the U.S. is creating too many dollars through the Fed, and fiscal disarray continues to threaten more of the same.

And here’s a real conflict brewing in the financial markets: The Fed is fighting deflation with a near-zero interest-rate target, while gold, the dollar and commodity markets are signaling that inflation is the real problem. Somebody is going to be very right here, and somebody is going to be very wrong. I’m betting on the markets being right.

So I have a thought, at least for the short run: The Fed should follow Australia, the first G-20 country to raise its target interest rate. The Aussies lifted their rate a quarter point to 3.25 percent. Right now, the U.S. Fed should lift its target rate by 25 basis points. The fed funds target is currently 15 basis points, so this move would make it 40 basis points. It would be a dollar-protection signal; a price-stability signal. At the least, it would be a beginning. Next, the Treasury should buy some dollars in the open market to back up the Fed.

Columbia professor and Nobel Prize winner Robert Mundell and Reagan advisor Arthur Laffer put this formula to work nearly 30 years ago, and it launched a massive low-inflation, bull-market prosperity. Of course, I am a supply-side fossil. I am a dinosaur and a relic of the past. But I still believe this approach could work again, even if it’s not going to happen.

The dollar has been falling on and off for nearly 10 years, and it’s in big trouble right now. The commodity inflation, housing bubble and oil shock of recent years all can be traced to dollar weakness and excess money-creation by the Fed. A weak dollar helped destroy the Bush Boom and create the Great Recession. But now people are talking about ending the dollar’s reserve-currency status.

Read page 2 at GOPUSA.com

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Sweetheart deals for illegal aliens — and Obama’s nominee for US attorney in Colorado

Posted on October 13, 2009. Filed under: homeland security | Tags: , , , , , , |

By Michelle Malkin

Tom Tancredo reports on corruption at the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement — and the continued plight of agent Cory Voorhis (via WND):

The federal government’s continued persecution of Immigration and Customs Enforcement, ICE, agent Cory Voorhis should alarm all Americans. Voorhis has been targeted for removal from his job because he dared to blow the whistle on politicians who were scheming with ICE bureaucrats to help criminal aliens avoid deportation – hundreds of them.

Voorhis went public in September 2006 with facts about the plea-bargaining practices of former Denver District attorney Bill Ritter, who happened to also be a candidate for governor of Colorado. During Ritter’s tenure as district attorney, 241 illegal aliens were given sweetheart deals for the explicit purpose of helping them minimize the risk of deportation. Some of them went on to commit other, more serious crimes, and when one of those cases was made public with Voorhis’ help, he was targeted for criminal investigation at the behest of the Ritter for Governor campaign.

Voorhis deserved a medal for his actions, but instead he was charged with violations of federal criminal law and then removed from his job after a federal court jury acquitted him of all charges after only two hours of deliberation. ICE managers were so embarrassed by this reversal, they launched a two-year effort to have him fired despite that acquittal. It has now been revealed that agency managers gave false testimony against Voorhis at his trial, yet no one at the top levels of the Department of Homeland Security had the courage to put a stop to the vendetta.

Voorhis has incurred more than $500,000 in legal bills and there is still no end in sight. His petition for reinstatement is now under review by an administrative judge attached to the Merit Systems Protection Board.

What is going on here? Why does ICE persist in trying to destroy a man whose only controversial action was to bring to the public’s attention information on certain criminal aliens already available to any enterprising reporter?

Aha! There’s the rub. If enterprising reporters started digging into the records of the plea-bargaining practices of prosecutors in sanctuary cities like Denver and San Francisco, who knows what mischief might ensue? In the agency’s view, Voorhis must be punished for throwing a huge public spotlight on these practices.

In retrospect, it is clear ICE overreacted. No reporter has bothered to look into the case histories of the other 240 plea-bargain cases uncovered in 2008. In fact, those 241 cases were only a sampling from a five-year period and were only the cases where “agricultural trespass” was used as the lesser offense to avoid deportation. Most likely there were more than 1,000 cases of sweetheart plea bargains for illegal aliens under Ritter’s tenure as Denver district attorney. How many exist in other cities? How many times have ICE legal staff – in Denver and elsewhere – assisted in the obstruction of our criminal-alien deportation laws?

The story has legs because President Obama has nominated one Stephanie Villafuerte as the next US attorney for Colorado. Villafuerte, as Tancredo points out, was the person on gubernatorial candidate Bill Ritter’s campaign team who made the first call in September 2006 to the Denver D.A.’s office to inquire about the illegal alien mentioned in the newspapers stories; was the person also on a leave of absence from the Denver D.A.’s office to work in the Ritter campaign; was rewarded with a job as a principal deputy to Governor Ritter; and was the point person on immigration matters.

Read the rest of this article at Michelle Malkin.com

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